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What's Happening Here

         Don't forget our Harvest Tea on Sept 28 here at the Museum. 2 P.M. to 4:30 P.M.

                   We are serving Gingerbread Cake with whipped cream     

 

     People love to donate special artifacts to the museum. They can be items that have special meaning to  their family and want to have them displayed here for posterity.  You need to know that the museum is governed by rules on how we acquire and add to our collections here. We are required to follow our mandate which has been in place for years. It states; "The mandate is to collect, preserve, research, exhibit, and interpret artifacts reflecting the period of 1927- 1936 of a doctor's home in a small prairie town for the purpose of research, education and enjoyment of the general public."We also want you to know there is a process for us to take items.  Please do not drop items off on our doorstep because by law we cannot accept them.  We must by law meet with the owner of the item and have them sign a "Gift Card Agreement."  Without that gift card we have no ownership of that item and cannot keep it or add it to our collection. By law we cannot sell it either and MUST dispose of it. Once you sign ownership of that item over it is registered and from that point onward it's physical  location is tracked. Each registration has a drawing of the artifact and full description including dimensions, donator name and date of donation. Items that are not on display are stored in  special acid free boxes.  We handle artifacts with gloves and also provide gloves for patrons who wish to handle items. All objects that are accepted  into the museums collection are done with the understanding that they will be there for posterity.

                                                                                              Sept 05/18  Gail Van Staveren

 

 

 

As of Sept 1st we go back to winter hours Tuesday thru Friday 10A.M. to 4 P.M

 

 

  

 

 

 

                                               WHERE HAVE ALL THE FLOWERS GONE

     You will notice that we have one flower bed at the very front of the museum that is now completly bare. The City of Leduc Horticulturists; who help me care for the garden, discovered Creeping Bell Flower in that bed. For those of you familiar with it; that particular noxious weed is a bad one.  The internet describes  it as "The zombie weed' or  "A burly thug."  So, we have attemped to eradicate it from that bed. It has been sprayed and dug up several times now.  When dug the dirt is all sifted through a sieve to remove any stray roots or bits that could other wise escape notice. Here's hoping it is all gone. 

     Thank you to The city of Leduc for all the help with the gardens this past spring and summer..... Could not have done it without you..     Gail Van Staveren  Sept 2018

 

For all the people of Leduc that I have spoken to as they passed the museum this past spring and summer.

I loved talking to each and everyone of you.

I just planted 80 tulip bulbs in the museum gardens just for you to enjoy.  Watch for a lovely show this spring. Something to look forward to this winter.....

Here's to you LEDUC...

Gail Van Staveren September 2018

 

Our Volunteers shaped this Museum

     When I think of volunteers, I think of people who give a few hours a week to help the needy.  But, what of  the people that have taken voluntarism to a whole new level as a full time job.  They make a cause their passion and life's work without monetary reward.  This is the case with the Leduc Historical Society and their love of The Woods House Museum.

     In 1982 The city of Leduc purchased the house that had been the home and medical offfice of Dr. Robert Theodore Woods, His wife Olive and their Children.  After Dr Woods passed away in 1936;  Olive moved, and the home changed hands a few times up until 1982.   At that time the only original items left of the house was the woodwork, a very rare Art Deco ceiling, the living room lights and a built in ironing board.  When the area people heard that the Historical Society was attempting to restore the home as accurately as possible; a Gone With The Wind Lamp that had been in the Wood's living room was returned to the house.  Then, Olive's sewing machine was found and also donated.  Marion woods gave detailed descriptions of every article in her partents home and where it belonged.  The Historical Society ladies let the public know they would take donations of antiques and other artifacts pertaining to the years 1910 to 1950.  Bit by bit they furnished the entire house to create a museum true to that era as per marion's recollection.  Each item added to the house was meticulously catalogued. Money was tight so the ladies baked, put on high teas, had garage sale, school tours and rented out the tea room for social events just to keep the museum open.   They did all the house work, yard work and maintenance to keep the house in order.

     Fast forward to 2018 and you will find soome of those wormen stlll involved in running of the museum.  Old age has taken some of the oiriginal members who have passed away or become disabled and can no longer serve.  Some still come and do their part by serving the community of Leduc and keeping the museum open by having volunteered their time and work for over 30 years.

     Why volunteer for over 30 years of your life?  My guess is that it was a labor of love and the joy of many solid friendships that arose from that mutual passion.  That and the satisfaction of a job well done.

                                                                                         Gail Van Staveren  August 2018

 

 

Summer???? What Summer

     The Russians describe their summers as nine months of anticipation with three months of disappointment.  This year I can certainly relate to that.. Raise your hand if you feel like we got short changed on Summer this year.  With that been said check our events page for our fall line up of events coming to the museum.

                                                                                             Gail Van Staveren  August 2018

 

 

Fresh paint Here

     Dr Wood's House Museum got an exterior facelift in the form of a fresh coat of paint this month..Danny of DBP Enterprises and his crew cleaned, scraped off old paint and then applied a coat of fresh white paint to the house's  previously painted areas. The porch landings and steps were repainted grey.  The shed also got spiffed up and sports a coat of cream paint trimmed in white.  The stucco is in need of repair and we are planning that next so the old house goes into winter as protected as we can get it.  This  old house is ninety years old.. I found some photos at the museum that Dr. Woods took of the building of his home.  Imagine my suprise to see all around the outward edge of the lawn but the tiny hedge plants that were planted at the same time as the house was built. This hedge around the museum is likely ninety years old too.

                                                                       Gail Van Staveren  August 2018

 

 

     To celebrate the warm weather  the ladies of the Historical Society put on their first High Tea of the season. On June 1st we served Flapper Pie and  either tea or coffee to 91 patrons in two and a half hours.  There was a charge of $5 for this event.  The beverage was served in traditional china cups and saucers.. Many folks came dressed for this event with hats.. The Flapper Pie was made by our crew of ladies - many who have been volunteering and cooking for the museum for up to 30 years.

     For two and a half days before the tea, in the tiny basement kitchen they worked to make 22 pies.  A Herculean undertaking.  The aroma wafts through the house and smells yummy.  The tables are set with lovely tablecloths, cream and sugar, tiny spoons and lovely flower arrangements from our own garden.  Tea and coffee was brewed, cream whipped and we were ready for our guests.

                                                                                                      Gail Van Staveren June 2018

 

 

Warm weather welcomed here

       This past winter seemed  like it was never going to end.  Then suddenly it went from  winter one day to summer the next.

       Just as we were settling into summer; spring sprang into life.  Actually it sprang several times before it settled down.  We kept wondering each day warm coat or not.  I think the garden at the museum felt the same way.

     Lucky for us the plants are mostly  Alberta hardy.  I saw them peek out of the ground then decide the coast was clear and overnight grow two or three inches. As keeper of the grounds this year I have had the pleasure of talking to  lots of folks passing by.  Many inquire about the museum and often I can direct them in to take a tour.

     Everyone is welcome and admission is by donation.  Our summer hours as of June 1st are Tuesday thru Sunday, 10:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M.  After you tour that grand old house come stroll the gardens. Photos outside are allowed and welcome.

                                                                                                           Gail Van Staveren  May 2018

                                                               

 

      We have two new additions to our Museum gardens this spring. In our front sidewalk arbour beds we installed two Lonicera "Dropmore Scarlet " (Honeysuckle). The beds on either side of the arbour were reshaped and new soil mixed with composted manure  added. The old arbour was cleaned and painted with paint donated by Benjamin Moore Leduc Wall Fashions.

     We chose the Dropmore Honeysuckle because it is purely Canadian and very hardy.  It was developed by Frank Skinner (1882-1967. Dr Skinner immigrated from Aberdeenshire Scotland in 1895 to Dropmore Manitoba.  As an adult he became a renouned plant breeder and Horticulturist. The University of Manitoba awarded him a Honorary Doctorate of Laws. In 1947 he established a nursery in Dropmore where he developed Canadian Roses, Flowering Crab, Pear, Lilac, Clematis and his acclaimed Scarlet Honeysuckle.  This Honeysuckle can be found all over North  America today.  Although the nursery is closed now, there remains the Frank Skinner Arboretum and Trail for the public to enjoy. 

     The scarlet blossoms of the Honeysuckle attract Hummingbirds and we hope that we will have these small visitors come to our Woods Museum Gardens.  Come visit yourself; sit, relax and enjoy this step back into history in the middle of the city.

                                                                                                          Gail Van Staveren April 2018